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Using camera raw to edit my photos is by far my favorite tool. It’s amazing because it is nondestructive, meaning, any changes performed will not alter the original image. Allowing a photographer the opportunity to return to the original photo at any time. It is also chuck full of sliders and toolbars that allow for optimal editing and creating. The only drawback is that layers are none existent. It also can fix mistakes from the original photo, which is the case for the following photo.


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1 – River Rocks – Rigby, ID 10/10/10 – f/3.9, 1/4, ISO 400 – Nikon S70

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HDR is a cool fad going on right now in the photography world. When overdone it can look extremely fake but when done correctly, it makes for some great shots. HDR is a technique where the dynamic range of shadows, highlights and colors from any given scene are amplified and combined into one composition. This can be accomplished with bracketing, taking three separate photos at three different exposure settings, or a single, slightly underexposed photo.


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Macros have to be my most favorite shot. I think anyone who knows my work knows this. I like to use depth-of-field as much as possible, I think it creates the best compositions of all. I’ve recently learned to overlay images, and combining two macros makes for an even better composition when done correctly.


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1 – Bucket o’ Bars Overlay – Bannack, MT 09/29/10 – f/3.5, 1/13, ISO 100 –
SONY A100

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Portraits, at least for me, are one of the most challenging photos to pull off. We like to look good in photos, that the first challenge to overcome and there are a vast amount of techniques and principles that must be followed in order for us to overcome this challenge. So in the photos below I tried my hardest to at least find good lighting and then work with that.


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1 – Mike 1 – Dubois, ID 09/29/10 – f/5.6, 1/400, ISO 100 – SONY A100

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The ability of the eye to frame a subject and then change points of focus at any given moment is part of what makes human eye sight so fun. So naturally when we see multiple shot of the same subject but with a different point of focus at each shot, our senses are happy. That is what reverse shallow depth of field tries to accomplish.


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Bannack Montana is a great place to visit. It’s a ghost town and as one should expect, many ghost can be found if your camera is set right. This ghost shot is unique, it is a product from a mistake. Because the way this image turned out was not planned, it made for an interesting ghost shot.


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1 – Ghost in Hotel – Bannack, MT 09/29/10 – f/22.0, BULB, ISO 100 – SONY A100

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These photos were taken both in Rigby, ID and Temple Square, ID. This week in class we learned the advantage of using smart filters to make future editing easier and assuring that the image quality is never lost. The two pictures I chose to demonstrate this assignment worked out perfectly in showcasing how smart filters can be used.

In this post I’m going to do things a little bit different than in the past. I’m going to give a sort description on the editing each photo undertook to get it to the quality that it is.


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These first photos were taken while I was in Utah for my cousin Cindy’s wedding. It was a magnificent day. And despite being super bright, I was able to get some decent shots. I’m kind of excited that I was able to take a picture of a bee, I’ve never had that opportunity before.

In this post I’m going to do things a little bit different than in the past. I’m going to give a sort description on the editing each photo undertook to get it to the quality that it is.


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These first photos were taken from the same little hut as in my Color Study: Brown post.  That little hut’s amazing lighting from the west facing entrance made for some amazing shots that I couldn’t pass up.  The back bedroom once upon a time was surrounded by blue walls with a sing bed.  But time has rendered the room “broken”.

A blending effect applied to two different shots conveys the idea that time really has “broken” this little room.  NOTE:  The shots were taken at sunrise, luckily the light was filtered by a batch of clouds on the horizon.


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